Polymorphic signals of harassed female odonates and the males that learn them support a novel frequency-dependent model

@article{Fincke2004PolymorphicSO,
  title={Polymorphic signals of harassed female odonates and the males that learn them support a novel frequency-dependent model},
  author={Ola M Fincke},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2004},
  volume={67},
  pages={833-845}
}
  • O. Fincke
  • Published 1 May 2004
  • Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract For mate-searching species, the learned mate recognition (LMR) hypothesis assumes that sexual harassment favours signal variation among females, which exploits the receiver ability of males. The model predicts that coevolving males have responded to the female sexual foil by learning to recognize female variants as potential mates. I translate the LMR hypothesis into the language of signal detection theory to explain its novelty as a dynamic, coevolutionary, negative frequency… Expand

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