Polyhedral surfaces in wedge products

@article{Rrig2009PolyhedralSI,
  title={Polyhedral surfaces in wedge products},
  author={Thilo R{\"o}rig and G{\"u}nter M. Ziegler},
  journal={Geometriae Dedicata},
  year={2009},
  volume={151},
  pages={155-173}
}
We introduce the wedge product of two polytopes. The wedge product is described in terms of inequality systems, in terms of vertex coordinates as well as purely combinatorially, from the corresponding data of its constituents. The wedge product construction can be described as an iterated “subdirect product” as introduced by McMullen (Discrete Math 14:347–358, 1976); it is dual to the “wreath product” construction of Joswig and Lutz (J Combinatorial Theor A 110:193–216, 2005). One particular… 

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