Polygyny in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca: a test of the deception hypothesis

@article{Stenmark1988PolygynyIT,
  title={Polygyny in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca: a test of the deception hypothesis},
  author={Geir Stenmark and Tore Slagsvold and Jan T. Lifjeld},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1988},
  volume={36},
  pages={1646-1657}
}
Abstract The deception hypothesis has been proposed as an explanation for polygyny in the pied flycatcher. According to this hypothesis, already-mated males hide their mating status with polyterritorial behaviour and thereby increase their chances of obtaining a second mate. In a study area at Oslo, Norway, secondary females raised 84% as many fledglings as did concurrent monogamous and primary females. The unmated males sang most of the time near their nest site, whereas the already-mated… Expand
Polygyny in the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca): comparison of deception and non-deception models
TLDR
The results showed that the proportion of secondary females increased when the density of males increased, as well when the operational sex ratio increased in favour of females, but these results were indistinguishable between the models when number of simulation repetitions was low. Expand
Does female aggression prevent polygyny? An experiment with pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca)
TLDR
A mate choice experiment on pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca is presented to provide prospecting females with a choice between displaying mated males some of which have initial mates with artificially reduced levels of aggressiveness. Expand
Polygyny and female aggression in the pied flycatcher: a comment on Rätti et al.
TLDR
It is argued that a test of the female aggression hypothesis on pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, concluded that female aggression was not important in explaining polyterritoriality in this species but that the deception hypothesis was mope plausible. Expand
Female-female aggression explains polyterritoriality in male pied flycatchers
Abstract Many male pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca , try to attract a second mate in a distant territory around the time their initial mate lays her clutch. In this study their success atExpand
Parental Care and Polygyny in the Chiffchaff Phylloscopus Collybita
TLDR
This is the first study that reports associated costs to secondary females due to the lack of paternal aid after the young have fledged the nest, since secondary females can obtain compensatory benefits, as predicted by the polygyny threshold model, since most of them settled in good quality habitats, close to the primary females. Expand
Polygyny in the tree swallowTachycineta bicolor: a result of the cost of searching for an unmated male
TLDR
It is suggested that a mate-search cost is leading to the few cases of polygamous males: in a short-lived bird with a short breeding season, the cost to females of searching for a more dedicated male is the risk of not breeding at all. Expand
Polygyny and its fitness consequences for primary and secondary female pied flycatchers
  • T. Huk, W. Winkel
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2006
TLDR
It was revealed that direct reproductive success, i.e. number of fledglings, was lower in females that mated with bigynous males, especially in secondary broods without male assistance, than in females in the pied flycatcher that mates with monogamous males. Expand
Polygyny in the european starling: effect on female reproductive success
TLDR
The results conflict with the predictions of the polygyny threshold model and the sexy son hypothesis, that secondary females should gain evolutionary advantage in either the short or long term. Expand
Deceptive behavior in pied flycatchers
TLDR
It is concluded that when a female is present male pied flycatchers change their behavior in ways that make it more difficult to discriminate mated from unmated males. Expand
Does female-female aggression explain male polyterritoriality in the pied flycatcher? A reply to Slagsvold & Dale
Slagsvold & Dale (1995) have argued that our study (R&i et al. 1994) was not a valid test of the female aggression hypothesis of polyterritoriality of pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca. Their mainExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 29 REFERENCES
Polyterritorial Polygyny in the Pied Flycatcher: Male Deception or Female Choice?
TLDR
This view contradicts the Orians-Verner model (Verner 1964; Orians 1969) that predicts polygyny will occur in situations in which the distribution of resources is sufficiently irregular that a female mating with an already paired male on a territory ofsuperior quality has equal or better eproductive success than if she mated with an unmated male on an inferior quality. Expand
The sexy son hypothesis: data from the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The applicability of the sexy son hypothesis is limited since it is based on the unrealistic assumption of relatively high heritability for a character with great influence on male fitness, as illustrated by the relation between lifetime reproductive success and tarsus length. Expand
The Conflict Between Male Polygamy and Female Monogamy: The Case of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
It is contention that, in the "battle between the sexes," the male sex is relatively victorious in the pied flycatcher as compared with most altricial bird species which are strictly or almost strictly monogamous. Expand
On the cost of searching for a mate in female pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The length of the premating period was negatively correlated with female body weight and prevailing air temperature, indicating that the females were subject to an energy constraint when searching, and competition for a mate, rather than for food, may explain the spacing of males. Expand
Allocation of incubation feeding in a polygynous mating system: a study on pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The pattern of investment by polygynous males was unrelated to the time-lag between completion of the different clutches and to any difference in clutch size, and the reduction in the delivery rate to polygynously mated females had a negative effect on their incubation efficiency. Expand
Why do pied flycatcher females mate with already-mated males?
TLDR
It is suggested that males, by being polyterritorial, deceive females into accepting polygyny; and females can be deceived since they do not have time to find out the marital status of males. Expand
The Conflict Between Male Polygamy and Female Monogamy: Some Comments on the "Cheating Hypothesis"
TLDR
It is proposed that male pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca "cheat" some females into becoming their secondary mates, and the finding that these secondary females raise fewer offspring than do the mates of monogamous males raises fewer offspring. Expand
EVOLUTION OF POLYGAMY IN THE LONG‐BILLED MARSH WREN
TLDR
It is pointed out that if sexual selection results in sexual dimorphism expressed during the period of parental care, there may be a change in average expenditure per sex with a consequent change in sex ratio, and mate preference, which in my opinion should have a profound influence on the mating system, may also have an effect on the sex ratio. Expand
Polygyny and nest site selection in the pied flycatcher
TLDR
The results indicate that male mating success should be closely dependent on the male's ability to monopolize attractive nest sites. Expand
The Influence of Habitats on Mating Systems of North American Passerine Birds
TLDR
Regardless of sex ratio, a polygynous mating is expected to be adaptive for the females as well as for the male, and marshes and prairies are more likely than forests to present the minimum requisite food supply and sufficiently great differences in available food between territories for selection to favor polygyny. Expand
...
1
2
3
...