Polygyny does not explain the superior competitive ability of dominant ant associates in the African ant‐plant, Acacia (Vachellia) drepanolobium

@inproceedings{Boyle2018PolygynyDN,
  title={Polygyny does not explain the superior competitive ability of dominant ant associates in the African ant‐plant, Acacia (Vachellia) drepanolobium
},
  author={John H Boyle and Dino J Martins and Julianne Pelaez and Paul M. Musili and Staline Kibet and S Kimani Ndung'u and David Kenfack and Naomi E Pierce},
  booktitle={Ecology and evolution},
  year={2018}
}
The Acacia drepanolobium (also known as Vachellia drepanolobium) ant-plant symbiosis is considered a classic case of species coexistence, in which four species of tree-defending ants compete for nesting space in a single host tree species. Coexistence in this system has been explained by trade-offs in the ability of the ant associates to compete with each other for occupied trees versus the ability to colonize unoccupied trees. We seek to understand the proximal reasons for how and why the ant… CONTINUE READING
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Polygyny does not explain the superior competitive ability of dominant ant associates in the African ant-plant, Acacia (Vachellia) drepanolobium

JH Boyle, DJ Martins, J Pelaez
Ecol Evol. 2018;8:1441–1450 • 2018

Impacts of worker density in colony- level aggression, expansion, and survival of the acacia- ant Crematogaster mimosae

J. C. Ruiz-Guajardo, D. L. Grossenbacher, R. K. Grosberg, T. M. Palmer, M. L. Stanton
Ecological Monographs, • 2017

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