Polygyny and its fitness consequences for primary and secondary female pied flycatchers

@article{Huk2006PolygynyAI,
  title={Polygyny and its fitness consequences for primary and secondary female pied flycatchers},
  author={Thomas Huk and Wolfgang Winkel},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={273},
  pages={1681 - 1688}
}
  • T. Huk, W. Winkel
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
In polygynous species with biparental care, the amount of paternal support often varies considerably. In the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca), females mated with monogamous males receive more male assistance during the nestling phase than females mated with bigynous males, as the latter have to share their mates with another female. Bigynous males, however, give more support to their primary broods than to their secondary broods. Using a long-term dataset (31 years), the present study… Expand

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