Polyandry, cloaca-pecking and sperm competition in dunnocks

@article{Davies1983PolyandryCA,
  title={Polyandry, cloaca-pecking and sperm competition in dunnocks},
  author={Nicholas Barry Davies},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1983},
  volume={302},
  pages={334-336}
}
A variety of behaviours adopted by males before and after copulation serve to increase paternity. The most spectacular examples occur in insects where males increase their own chances of fertilizing the female's eggs by mate guarding, mating plugs and even removal of other males' sperm1,2. Here, sperm competition is described for a small European passerine bird, the dunnock (Prunella modularis), where females are often mated simultaneously to two males3,4 and where there is an elaborate pre… 
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TLDR
Recent studies of extra-pair copulations and paternity in birds indicate that sperm competition may have been an important factor in the evolution of such reproductive behaviours as mate guarding and copulation.
Female Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) mated with males that harassed them are unlikely to lay fertilized eggs.
TLDR
It is shown that a female quail choosing between a previous sex partner and an unfamiliar male avoids the former if he engaged in relatively many potentially injurious acts while courting and mating, and that males behaving aggressively toward mates are less likely than are gentler males to fertilize the females' eggs.
COPULATIONS AND MATE GUARDING OF THE SPOONBILL (PLATALEA LEUCORODIA)
TLDR
It is considered that copulations are not completed without collaboration on the part of the female, their permissiveness towards EPCAs during the fertile period suggests advantages to females, and genetic quality of the offspring may be improved by this behaviour.
CLOACAL INSPECTION OR PECKING IN ALLEN'S HUMMINGBIRD
Cloacal pecking, in which a male pecks at the cloaca of a female, causing her to void sperm, was first described in the Dunnock (Prunella modularis), a species with a very complex group-breeding
Cooperation and conflict among dunnocks, Prunella modularis, in a variable mating system
Female feral fowl eject sperm of subdominant males
TLDR
It is shown that in female feral fowl most copulations are coerced, and that females consistently bias sperm retention in favour of the preferred male phenotype.
Copulation patterns and sperm competition in the polygynandrous Smith's longspur
TLDR
The occurrence of multiple mating by females and the lack of territorial behavior in males suggests that frequent copulations in this species evolved as an adaptation to sperm competition.
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References

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