Pollinator shifts drive increasingly long nectar spurs in columbine flowers

@article{Whittall2007PollinatorSD,
  title={Pollinator shifts drive increasingly long nectar spurs in columbine flowers},
  author={J. Whittall and S. A. Hodges},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={447},
  pages={706-709}
}
  • J. Whittall, S. A. Hodges
  • Published 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature
  • Directional evolutionary trends have long garnered interest because they suggest that evolution can be predictable. However, the identification of the trends themselves and the underlying processes that may produce them have often been controversial. In 1862, in explaining the exceptionally long nectar spur of Angraecum sesquipedale, Darwin proposed that a coevolutionary ‘race’ had driven the directional increase in length of a plant’s spur and its pollinator’s tongue. Thus he predicted the… CONTINUE READING
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