Pollen flow within and among isolated populations of two rare, self-compatible plant species from inselbergs of Northeast Brazil

@article{Wanderley2020PollenFW,
  title={Pollen flow within and among isolated populations of two rare, self-compatible plant species from inselbergs of Northeast Brazil},
  author={Artur M. Wanderley and Eloyza Karoline R. dos Santos and Leonardo Galetto and Ana Maria Benko-Iseppon and Isabel Cristina Machado},
  journal={Plant Ecology},
  year={2020},
  volume={221},
  pages={229-240}
}
Endangered species in isolated habitats (e.g., inselbergs) may escape mate limitation during patch colonization through autonomous self-pollination. After colonization, the higher the number of plants breeding randomly within populations through cross-pollination, the lower is genetic erosion caused by genetic drift and inbreeding. Additionally, pollen flow among patches can increase population genetic variation [natural genetic recovery (NGR)]. Autonomous self- and cross-pollination were… 
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