Politics is nothing but medicine at a larger scale: reflections on public health’s biggest idea

@article{Mackenbach2008PoliticsIN,
  title={Politics is nothing but medicine at a larger scale: reflections on public health’s biggest idea},
  author={Johan P. Mackenbach},
  journal={Journal of Epidemiology \& Community Health},
  year={2008},
  volume={63},
  pages={181 - 184}
}
  • J. Mackenbach
  • Published 3 December 2008
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
This article retraces the historical origins and contemporary resonances of Rudolf Virchow’s famous statement “Medicine is a social science, and politics nothing but medicine at a larger scale”. Virchow was convinced that social inequality was a root cause of ill-health, and that medicine therefore had to be a social science. Because of their intimate knowledge of the problems of society, doctors, according to Virchow, also were better statesmen. Although Virchow’s analogies between biology and… Expand
Rudolf Virchow, poverty and global health: from “politics as medicine on a grand scale” to “health in all policies”
  • K. Lange
  • Political Science
  • Global Health Journal
  • 2021
Abstract The German pathologist and politician Rudolf Virchow proposed the concept of sociomedical causation, emphasising the role of social and environmental factors in the aetiology and preventionExpand
Is epidemiology nothing but politics at a different level?
  • A. Morabia
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
  • 2009
TLDR
Rudolf Virchow (1821–1902), the German cellular pathologist whose contribution to public health Mackenbach discusses in this issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, is a paradoxical figure that was in agreement with some of the greatest public health figures of his time. Expand
Paul Farmer: Structural Violence and the Embodiment of Inequality
Paul Farmer is one of the most influential advocates for health equity in the world today. His analyses — rooted in both social science and medicine, owing to his training in anthropology andExpand
Comics and revolution as global public health intervention: The Case of Lissa.
In this article, we discuss the inextricable entanglement of public health and political revolution, and why comics is a particularly amenable medium to explore how different people come to termsExpand
Medicine and politics: How to negotiate the minefield?
  • A. Banerjee
  • Political Science
  • Medical Journal of Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth
  • 2019
The principal purpose of medical journals such as Lancet and BMJ is to disseminate medical information. However, because of the association between medicine and politics, there may be instances whenExpand
On Death and Money: History, Facts, and Explanations.
TLDR
The relationship between income level and life expectancy is reported, which is already known that individuals with higher incomes can expect to live longer than those with lower incomes and that the relationship is not simply between rich and poor, but is graded by income, hence a gradient. Expand
Repression, famines, and wars: major impacts of politics on population health.
TLDR
It is concluded that the political history of Europe “ has left deep traces” in the LEB records of its nations, and that there is no evidence that the formation of the European Union had a converging effect on LEB of its member states. Expand
Studying Public Health Law: Principles, Politics, and Populations as Patients
Public health law is firmly establishing itself as a crucial area of scholarly inquiry. Its vital importance has been sharply underscored following the outbreak of COVID-19, in response to which weExpand
Pragmatism, Structural Reform and the Politics of Inequality in Global Public Health
Despite broad international agreement on the importance of addressing global health inequalities on grounds of both social justice and health security, there is little accord on how this should beExpand
Visions of Care: Medicalization and Public Patienthood in Sao Paulo, Brazil
ABSTRACT:Encompassing a range of critiques, from new regimes of governmentality and biopolitical control to the iatrogenic effects of scientific medicine's incursion into everyday life to theExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 53 REFERENCES
Has Socialism Failed? An Analysis of Health Indicators under Socialism
  • V. Navarro
  • Economics, Medicine
  • International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation
  • 1992
TLDR
The evidence presented in this article shows that the historical experience of socialism has not been one of failure: it has been, for the most part, more successful than capitalism in improving the health conditions of the world's populations. Expand
Doctors, politics and society : historical essays
Introduction. Janet SEMPLE: Bentham's Utilitarianism and the Provision of Medical Care. Robert WEBB: Southwood Smith: The Intellectual Sources of Public Service. Anne HARDY: Lyon Playfair and theExpand
Should the mission of epidemiology include the eradication of poverty?
TLDR
Contrary to what the critics suggest, epidemiology has been evolving in line with its public-health mission, and that the criticism itself—however noble in its motivation—is not coherent. Expand
Power and the Idealists: Or, the Passion of Joschka Fischer and Its Aftermath
The student uprisings of 1968 erupted not only in America but also across Europe, expressing a distinct generational attitude about politics, the corrupt nature of democratic capitalism, and the evilExpand
Politics and health outcomes
TLDR
These findings support the hypothesis that the political ideologies of governing parties affect some indicators of population health, and make an empirical link between politics and policy, by showing that political parties with egalitarian ideologies tend to implement redistributive policies. Expand
Silent Victories: The History and Practice of Public Health in Twentieth-Century America
  • S. Morse
  • Medicine
  • Emerging Infectious Diseases
  • 2007
TLDR
10 key public health advances of the 20th century are discussed and one theme that emerges is the importance of coalitions, often including not only the medical community and health departments (and sometimes industry), but also activists, reformers, and even ordinary citizens who became passionate about a cause. Expand
The origins of human disease: a short story on “where diseases come from”
  • J. Mackenbach
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
  • 2006
TLDR
This paper suggests that, in all its manifestations, disease is a reaction of the human organism to, and/or a failure to cope with, one or more unbalancing changes in its internal environment. Expand
Social Inequalities in Health
Abstract: Differentials in health and longevity by socioeconomic status and by the nature of social relationships have been found in innumerable studies in the social and medical sciences. ThreeExpand
Social Inequalities in Health: New Evidence and Policy Implications
TLDR
This book is the result of a five year European Science Foundation Programme on “Social Variation in Health Expectancy in Europe,” and includes contributors who are among the most distinguished scientists in the field. Expand
Point-counterpoint. The triumph of the null hypothesis: epidemiology in an age of change.
  • W. Maziak
  • Medicine
  • International journal of epidemiology
  • 2009
TLDR
Applying an evolutionary perspective, that views health problems of modernity as a manifestation of the mismatch between the authors' ancient genes and hi-tech lifestyles, can provide guidance for a 21st century research agenda. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...