Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) invading North America: some hypotheses for its rapid spread

@article{Cervo2000PolistesD,
  title={Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) invading North America: some hypotheses for its rapid spread},
  author={Rita Cervo and Francesca Zacchi and Stefano Turillazzi},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2000},
  volume={47},
  pages={155-157}
}
Summary:Polistes dominulus, a common Polistes species with Old World distribution, is now invading the United States. We discuss those characteristics of P. dominulus that may explain its successful establishment in its new American environment. A versatile diet, the ability to colonize new environments and a short development time of the immature brood might have played an important role in the rapid spread in P. dominulus. 
Polistes dominula (Christ, 1791) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae) found in South Dakota, U.S.A.
Polistes dominula (Christ, 1791) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae), a Palearctic paper wasp established in North America, is reported for the first time from the state of South Dakota, U.S.A.
Presencia de una nueva avispa social exótica, Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) en la Patagonia argentina
TLDR
The social wasp Polistes dominulus (Christ) (Christ), of Paleartic origin, but has been established in Chile for at least 20 years, is reported in Argentina.
First detailed report of brood parasitoidism in the invasive population of the paper wasp Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) in North America
TLDR
This work presents the first well documented case of parasitoidism of the invasive population of P.dominulus in North America and concludes that this population is benefiting from a post-invasion release from enemies.
Rapid Range Expansion of the Invasive Wasp Polistes dominula (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae) and First Record of Parasitoids on this Species and the Native Polistes marginalis in the Western Cape Province of South Africa
TLDR
Biological control initiatives are largely geared to reconnect IAS with their natural predators and parasites, but this necessitates the release of yet another alien organism.
Wolbachia in the invasive European paper wasp Polistes dominulus
TLDR
Data show that infected individuals from New York, Massachusetts, and Italy carry the same Wolbachia strain, and that some mtDNA haplotypes include both infected and uninfected individuals, and possible implications of Wolbachian infection in this invasive social hymenopteran are discussed.
Presence of Strepsiptera Parasites in the Independent-founding Wasp, Polistes satan
TLDR
The obligate parasitic insect group, Strepsiptera in the gaster of Polistes satan Bequaert adult females is detected and a total of four stylopized wasps in three colonies during the wet season are identified.
The Hover Wasps
TLDR
The Hover Wasps (Stenogastrinae) comprise 58 described species in 7 genera which are distributed in the South East Asian tropics, from India to New Guinea, and a sketch of their systematics is offered.
Notes on Fruit Damage by the European Paper Wasp, Polistes dominula (Christ) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
TLDR
The European paper wasp has colonized much of Colorado during the past decade and has emerged as a dominant species of nuisance wasp, but in western Colorado it is also a common pest in fruit orchards and can be very damaging to ripening grapes and other thin-fleshed stone fruits.
Polistes dominula (Christ) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae) recorded from Nebraska.
TLDR
Polistes dominula (Christ) is reported for the first time from the state of Nebraska based on specimens from the city of Lincoln, and may spread throughout Nebraska, given its expansion in other areas of North America and its presence in nearby states with common landscape features.
Colony productivity of Polistes dominula (Christ) (Hymenoptera, Vespidae: Polistinae) wasps nesting on plants by haplometrosis: Regression analysis
TLDR
Analysis of the relationships of various colony characteristics in the resocial wasp Polistes dominula nesting on plants in the south of Ukraine in 2003-2007 finds that the number of future foundresses and nest size at the end of the life cycle depend on the queen longevity and on thenumber of workers in the colony.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 23 REFERENCES
EARLY SURVIVAL OF POLISTES APACHUS (HYMENOPTERA: VESPIDAE) COLONIES IN CALIFORNIA: A FIELD STUDY OF AN INTRODUCED SPECIES
Abstract A local population of P. apachus in California was studied to determine population structure and colony survival during the first 3 months of colony development. Only 24.2% of the colonies
Biological Studies of Polistes in North Carolina (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
TLDR
Though nest founding by overwintering queens began in early April, most nests were established in late April and early May, and diurnal and seasonal variations in the number of returners with various materials were influenced by temperature.
Parasites and Symbionts of Nests of Polistes Wasps
TLDR
Twenty-three species of insects were known to be associated with Polistes nests in the United States; data on 18 additional insects and 1 mite species were gathered during this study.
A novel ‘sit and wait’ reproductive strategy in social wasps
  • P. Starks
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1998
TLDR
Evidence is presented indicating that a subset of spring females in the social wasp Polistes dominulus ‘sit and wait’ to adopt colonies initiated and abandoned by other conspecifics, the first to demonstrate conclusively this alternative reproductive strategy in social wasps.
Opportunistic adoption of orphaned nests in paper wasps as an alternative reproductive strategy
Biologia e comportamento sociale di Polistes nimpha (Christ) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
  • Tesi di Laurea, Università degli Studi di Firenze
  • 1983
THE ECOLOGY OF COOPERATION IN WASPS: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF ALTERNATIVE REPRODUCTIVE DECISIONS'
TLDR
The multiple reproductive options of P. dominulus lead to a dynamic and flexible balance between cooperation and conflict in their social interactions, and the decline in size differences between joining wasps and residents suggests that late-season joiners were relatively large wasps seeking to dominate residents.
The social wasps of the Americas excluding the Vespinae
...
...