Policy Effects, Partisanship, and Elections: How Medicaid Expansion Affected Public Opinion toward the Affordable Care Act

@article{Sances2021PolicyEP,
  title={Policy Effects, Partisanship, and Elections: How Medicaid Expansion Affected Public Opinion toward the Affordable Care Act},
  author={Michael W. Sances and Joshua D. Clinton},
  journal={The Journal of Politics},
  year={2021},
  volume={83},
  pages={498 - 514}
}
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is one of the most consequential policies enacted in recent decades, but its political divisiveness and complexity call into question whether its effects can change public opinion. Using the varied implementation of one of the ACA’s key provisions—the expansion of Medicaid—and nearly 300,000 survey responses analyzed using a difference-in-differences design, we find the expansion of Medicaid makes respondents 1.5 percentage points more positive toward the ACA and 2… 
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