Police Abolitionist Discourse? Why It Has Been Missing (and Why It Matters)

@article{Simon2019PoliceAD,
  title={Police Abolitionist Discourse? Why It Has Been Missing (and Why It Matters)},
  author={Jonathan Simon and Eduardo Bautista Duran and Tamara Rice Lave and Eric J. Miller},
  journal={The Cambridge Handbook of Policing in the United States},
  year={2019}
}

The inevitable fallibility of policing

ABSTRACT The title of this paper is taken from the final sentence of the book How People Judge Policing (Waddington et al. [2017]. How People Judge Policing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.) which,

Dignity and its discontents: Towards an abolitionist rethinking of dignity

As we approach the decade anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Plata (2011), it is perhaps a good time to take stock of some of the optimism expressed by this author (Simon, 2014)

The Police as Civic Neighbors

  • E. Miller
  • Law
    The Cambridge Handbook of Policing in the United States
  • 2019
Police work itself, and the authority vested in it, is not … simply the outcome of some social contract, but it is also the expression and to some extent the perpetuator of an ongoing form of social

References

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From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America

A policing is in a crisis of legitimacy. Due to well-publicized deaths of suspects in custody and obvious increases in militarization, even those of a disposition normally supportive of the police

Danger, Crime and Rights: A Conversation between Michel Foucault and Jonathan Simon

This article is a transcript of a conversation between Michel Foucault and Jonathan Simon in San Francisco in October 1983. It has never previously been published and is transcribed on the basis of a