Polar Dinosaurs

@article{Rich2002PolarD,
  title={Polar Dinosaurs},
  author={Thomas H. Rich and Pat Vickers-Rich and Roland A. Gangloff},
  journal={Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={295},
  pages={979 - 980}
}
Tracking polar dinosaurs-new finds from the Lower Cretaceous of Svalbard
A new discovery of ornithopod dinosaur tracks from Svalbard is described. The Lower Cretaceous (Barremian) section at Isfjorden consists of sandstones and interbeds consistent with an alluvial flood
A polar dinosaur-track assemblage from the Eumeralla Formation (Albian), Victoria, Australia
Martin, A.J., Rich, T.H., Hall, M., Vickers-Rich, P. & Vazquez-Prokopec, G., June 2012. A polar dinosaur-track assemblage from the Eumeralla Formation (Albian), Victoria, Australia. Alcheringa 36,
Dinosaur demise in light of their alleged perennial polar residency
  • Z. Lewy
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    International Journal of Earth Sciences
  • 2016
The end-Cretaceous biological crisis is represented by the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs. However, most crucial biologically was the elimination of the photosynthesizing marine phyto- and
DINOSAUR-BEARING HYPERCONCENTRATED FLOWS OF CRETACEOUS ARCTIC ALASKA: RECURRING CATASTROPHIC EVENT BEDS ON A DISTAL PALEOPOLAR COASTAL PLAIN
ABSTRACT The Cretaceous coastal plain of Arctic Alaska contains the richest concentration of high-latitude dinosaurs on Earth. Three bonebeds (Liscomb, Byers, Sling Point) are found in paleopolar
Oldest known avian footprints from Australia: Eumeralla Formation (Albian), Dinosaur Cove, Victoria
Two thin‐toed tridactyl tracks in a fluvial sandstone bed of the Eumeralla Formation (Albian) at Dinosaur Cove (Victoria, Australia) were likely made by avian trackmakers, making these the oldest
Quantitative Biofacies Analysis to Identify Relationships and Refine Controls on Paleosol Development, Prince Creek Formation, North Slope Alaska, USA
Late Cretaceous coastal plain deposits of the Prince Creek Formation (PCF) offer a rare glimpse into an ancient, high-latitude, arctic greenhouse ecosystem for which there is no modern analog. Here,
Paleontology: Snow falling on dinosaurs
Wear patterns and dental functioning in an Early Cretaceous stegosaur from Yakutia, Eastern Russia
TLDR
The combination of high degree of tooth wear with formation of multiple wear facets, complex jaw motions, relatively short tooth formation time and possibly high tooth replacement rates is interpreted as a special adaptation for a life in high-latitude conditions or, alternatively, as a common stegosaurian adaptation making stegosaurs a successful group of herbivorous dinosaurs in the Middle Jurassic–Early Cretaceous and enabeling them to live in both low- and high-Latitude ecosystems.
Cretaceous Climate
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References

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Polar dinosaur bone histology
ABSTRACT We report on the bone microstructure of a hypsilophodont and an ornithomimosaur from the Early Cretaceous, Otway Group of Dinosaur Cove in south-eastern Australia, which at the time lay well