Pneumotaxic centre and apneustic breathing: Interspecies differences between rat and cat

@article{Monteau1989PneumotaxicCA,
  title={Pneumotaxic centre and apneustic breathing: Interspecies differences between rat and cat},
  author={Roger Monteau and S. Errchidi and Philippe Gauthier and Gérard Hilaire and Paul Patrick Rega},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={1989},
  volume={99},
  pages={311-316}
}
A ‘pneumotaxic centre’ in rats
Characterizations and comparisons of eupnoea and gasping in neonatal rats.
TLDR
It is concluded that, from the day of birth, rats can exhibit eupnoea and gasping patterns which are very similar to those of adult animals, and this preparation of the in vitro brainstem spinal cord preparation is not suitable for investigation of the mechanisms that generate e upnoeic breathing.
Noradrenergic modulation of the medullary respiratory rhythm generator in the newborn rat: an in vitro study.
TLDR
Stimulation, lesion and NA microejection experiments suggested that the main site of NA action is located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, where electrical stimulations triggered inspiration prematurely, lesions suppressed the NA‐induced decrease in respiratory frequency, and localized application of NA led to an immediate decrease in the respiratory frequency.
The functional expression of a pontine pneumotaxic centre in neonatal rats.
TLDR
It is concluded that from the day of birth, rostral pontine pneumotaxic mechanisms play a significant role in the definition of eupnoea and rats can exhibit the classical ventilatory patterns of e upnoeoa, apneusis and gasping.
Permanent release of noradrenaline modulates respiratory frequency in the newborn rat: an in vitro study.
TLDR
It is suggested that the mechanisms underlying NA biosynthesis continue to function under these in vitro experimental conditions and are responsible for a permanent release of endogenous NA, which slows down the respiratory frequency.
Neurones in the ventrolateral pons are required for post‐hypoxic frequency decline in rats.
TLDR
The hypothesis that the ventrolateral pons is required for expression of post‐hypoxic frequency decline, defined as a decrease in respiratory frequency below steady‐state baseline levels following brief exposures to hypoxia, is tested and it is concluded that the mechanism responsible for post‐ Hypoxia frequency decline involves an active neural process that depends on the integrity of the ventral pons.
Research Report Pontine respiratory neurons in anesthetized cats
TLDR
These pontine respiratory neurons do not appear to receive a strong afferent input from the vagus, rather, vagal afferent inputs seem to be directed towards non-respiratory neurons that are located more medially in the dorsal pons.
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References

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The respiratory motoneuron and apneusis.
TLDR
It is suggested that the terms "apneustic," "pneumotaxic," and "respiratory" (inspiratory or expiratory) centers should be abandoned in view of the convoluted epistemology of the concepts they represent.
Observations on the respiratory centres in the cat
IN the course of investigations on the working of the respiratory mechanism in cats, dogs, rabbits and monkeys, I have made observations on the effect on respiration of section of the brain stem at
Respiratory rhythm generation in the in vitro brain stem‐spinal cord preparation of the neonatal rat.
  • T. Suzue
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of physiology
  • 1984
TLDR
An in vitro preparation was described for studying electrical activity of mammalian brain stem and spinal cord and it is suggested that this periodic activity corresponds to the respiratory rhythm generated in the brain stem of intact animals.
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