Plumage coloration is a sexually selected indicator of male quality

@article{Hill1991PlumageCI,
  title={Plumage coloration is a sexually selected indicator of male quality},
  author={Geoffrey E. Hill},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1991},
  volume={350},
  pages={337-339}
}
  • G. Hill
  • Published 28 March 1991
  • Biology
  • Nature
FEMALE choice of mates based on the expression of characters that correlate with male quality remains a controversial and largely untested idea1. By choosing quality males, females stand to gain resources2, genetic benefits for their offspring3–5, or both. In the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), male plumage coloration is a function of dietary intake of carotenoids6,7. Here I present results of field studies that indicate that females prefer to mate with colourful males and that plumage… Expand
MALE MATE CHOICE AND THE EVOLUTION OF FEMALE PLUMAGE COLORATION IN THE HOUSE FINCH
  • G. Hill
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1993
TLDR
Observations of a wild population of house finches suggest that female age is the primary criterion in male choice and that female plumage coloration is a secondary criterion, and fail to support the idea that female Plumage Coloration is an indicator of individual quality. Expand
Is male plumage reflectance correlated with paternal care in bluethroats
TLDR
This study finds no evidence of a relationship between male coloration of either the blue patch or the chestnut spot and the level of paternal care, and does not support the hypothesis thatmale coloration signals male parental quality (the good parent hypothesis) or the hypothesis That colorful males reduce their care in response to increased investment by females (the differential-allocation hypothesis). Expand
Plumage characteristics as an indicator of male parental quality in the American Kestrel
TLDR
It is indicated that plumage characteristics may reveal males' parental quality; plumage brightness predicts age and thus experience, and a narrow subterminal tail band predicts foraging ability especially of young, inexperienced males. Expand
Does female plumage coloration signal parental quality? A male removal experiment with the bluethroat (Luscinia s. svecica)
TLDR
There is no evidence for the good-parent hypothesis to explain female plumage coloration in bluethroats, which suggests that female coloration is subject to sexual selection through male choice. Expand
Heritable variation in a plumage indicator of viability in male great tits Parus major
TLDR
The results show that females mating with attractive male great tits realize an indirect fitness advantage, and that the viability of male offspring was correlated with the plumage traits of their putative father. Expand
Red coloration of male northern cardinals correlates with mate quality and territory quality
TLDR
Investigation of how mate quality and territory quality influence an extravagant ornament in a socially monogamous species that defends multipurpose territories found that redder males produced more offspring in a breeding season. Expand
Ornate plumage of male red junglefowl does not influence mate choice by females
TLDR
Results indicate that although females do discriminate between males, the plumage is not the target of the females' attention. Expand
Loss of Carotenoid Plumage Coloration Is Associated With Loss of Choice for Coloration in Domestic Canaries
TLDR
It is hypothesize that preference for brightly colored mates is ancestral in domestic canaries, but that strong artificial selection for white females to reproduce successfully with white males has eliminated the preference for color (along with color itself) in the white canaries. Expand
Are colorful males of great tits Parus major better parents? Parental investment is a matter of quality
TLDR
The data support the good parent hypothesis, insofar as parental investment is also a matter of quality, and that, at least in the Mediterranean area, caterpillars are not the only key food source. Expand
Carotenoid-based plumage coloration and aggression during molt in male house finches
TLDR
Results suggest that drab male dominance is not an artifact in eastern US populations and instead is a conserved property of native and non-native House Finches, and plumage color is correlated with dominance but does not serve as a visual signal of social status in this species. Expand
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Male coloration was independent of age, size, dominance, vocal activity and movement rate in these experiments, and females showed no significant association preference for any of these male characters, while paired males were significantly more colourful than males in the population at large. Expand
Female sticklebacks use male coloration in mate choice and hence avoid parasitized males
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It is shown that in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) the intensity of male red breeding coloration positively correlates with physical condition, and the females recognize the formerly parasitized males by the lower intensity of theirbreeding coloration. Expand
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Descriptions of the California House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus frontalis) are quite uniform in recognizing that orange occasionally takes the place of the typical red in the color of the males.Expand
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