Plumage brightness as an indicator of parental care in northern cardinals

@article{Linville1998PlumageBA,
  title={Plumage brightness as an indicator of parental care in northern cardinals},
  author={Susan U. Linville and Randall Breitwisch and Amy J. Schilling},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1998},
  volume={55},
  pages={119-127}
}
Good parent and differential allocation models predict relationships between degree of sexual ornamentation and parental care, but relatively few studies have tested these models. The northern cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis, is a sexually dichromatic species in which both sexes are ornamented. Males have red plumage, and females have tan plumage with limited areas of red feathering. Cardinals were used to address the two models and determine whether plumage brightness signals level of parental… Expand
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