Ploidy influences rarity and invasiveness in plants

@article{Pandit2011PloidyIR,
  title={Ploidy influences rarity and invasiveness in plants},
  author={Maharaj Krishan Pandit and Michael J.O. Pocock and William E. Kunin},
  journal={Journal of Ecology},
  year={2011},
  volume={99},
  pages={1108-1115}
}
Summary 1. The factors associated with plant species’ endangerment and (conversely) invasiveness are of broad interest due to their potential value in explaining the causes and consequences of population status. While most past work has focussed on ecological variables, recent work suggests that genetic attributes may be strongly associated with plant species status. 2. We collated data on chromosome numbers for 640 endangered species (worldwide) and their 9005 congeners, and for 81… Expand

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