Pleistocene to Holocene extinction dynamics in giant deer and woolly mammoth

@article{Stuart2004PleistoceneTH,
  title={Pleistocene to Holocene extinction dynamics in giant deer and woolly mammoth},
  author={A. J. Stuart and Pavel A Kosintsev and Thomas F.G. Higham and Adrian M Lister},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={431},
  pages={684-689}
}
The extinction of the many well-known large mammals (megafauna) of the Late Pleistocene epoch has usually been attributed to ‘overkill’ by human hunters, climatic/vegetational changes or to a combination of both. An accurate knowledge of the geography and chronology of these extinctions is crucial for testing these hypotheses. Previous assumptions that the megafauna of northern Eurasia had disappeared by the Pleistocene/Holocene transition were first challenged a decade ago by the discovery… 
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