Pleistocene Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest a Single Major Dispersal of Non-Africans and a Late Glacial Population Turnover in Europe

@article{Posth2016PleistoceneMG,
  title={Pleistocene Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest a Single Major Dispersal of Non-Africans and a Late Glacial Population Turnover in Europe},
  author={Cosimo Posth and Gabriel Renaud and Alissa Mittnik and Doroth{\'e}e G. Drucker and H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Rougier and Christophe Cupillard and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Valentin and Corinne Thevenet and Anja Furtw{\"a}ngler and Christoph Wissing and Michael Francken and Maria Malina and Michael Bolus and Martina Lari and Elena Gigli and Giulia Capecchi and Isabelle Crevecoeur and C{\'e}dric Beauval and Damien Flas and Mietje Germonpr{\'e} and J. vander Plicht and Richard Cottiaux and Bernard G{\'e}ly and Annamaria Ronchitelli and Kurt Wehrberger and Dan Alexandru Grigorescu and Jiř{\'i} Svoboda and Patrick Semal and David Caramelli and Herv{\'e} Bocherens and Katerina Harvati and Nicholas J. Conard and Wolfgang Haak and Adam Powell and Johannes Krause},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={26},
  pages={827-833}
}

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