Pleistocene Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest a Single Major Dispersal of Non-Africans and a Late Glacial Population Turnover in Europe

@article{Posth2016PleistoceneMG,
  title={Pleistocene Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest a Single Major Dispersal of Non-Africans and a Late Glacial Population Turnover in Europe},
  author={C. Posth and G. Renaud and Alissa Mittnik and D. Drucker and H. Rougier and Christophe Cupillard and F. Valentin and C. Thevenet and Anja Furtw{\"a}ngler and C. Wissing and M. Francken and M. Malina and M. Bolus and M. Lari and E. Gigli and G. Capecchi and I. Crevecoeur and C{\'e}dric Beauval and D. Flas and M. Germonpr{\'e} and J. V. Plicht and Richard Cottiaux and B. G{\'e}ly and Annamaria Ronchitelli and K. Wehrberger and D. Grigorescu and J. Svoboda and P. Semal and D. Caramelli and H. Bocherens and K. Harvati and N. Conard and W. Haak and Adam Powell and J. Krause},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={26},
  pages={827-833}
}
How modern humans dispersed into Eurasia and Australasia, including the number of separate expansions and their timings, is highly debated [1, 2]. Two categories of models are proposed for the dispersal of non-Africans: (1) single dispersal, i.e., a single major diffusion of modern humans across Eurasia and Australasia [3-5]; and (2) multiple dispersal, i.e., additional earlier population expansions that may have contributed to the genetic diversity of some present-day humans outside of Africa… Expand
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