Pleistocene Megafaunal Collapse, Novel Plant Communities, and Enhanced Fire Regimes in North America

@article{Gill2009PleistoceneMC,
  title={Pleistocene Megafaunal Collapse, Novel Plant Communities, and Enhanced Fire Regimes in North America},
  author={Jacquelyn L. Gill and John W. Williams and Stephen T. Jackson and Katherine B. Lininger and Guy S. Robinson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={1100 - 1103}
}
Demise of the Megafauna Approximately 10,000 years ago, the Pleistocene-Holocene deglaciation in North America produced widespread biotic and environmental change, including extinctions of megafauna, reorganization of plant communities, and increased wildfire. The causal links and sequences of these changes remain unclear. Gill et al. (p. 1100; see the Perspective by Johnson) unravel these connections in an analysis of pollen, charcoal, and the dung fungus Sporormiella from the sediments of… Expand
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  • 2014
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