Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia

@article{White2003PleistoceneHS,
  title={Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia},
  author={Tim D. White and Berhane Abrha Asfaw and David Degusta and Henry Gilbert and Gary D. Richards and Gen Suwa and Francis Clark Howell},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={423},
  pages={742-747}
}
The origin of anatomically modern Homo sapiens and the fate of Neanderthals have been fundamental questions in human evolutionary studies for over a century. A key barrier to the resolution of these questions has been the lack of substantial and accurately dated African hominid fossils from between 100,000 and 300,000 years ago. Here we describe fossilized hominid crania from Herto, Middle Awash, Ethiopia, that fill this gap and provide crucial evidence on the location, timing and contextual… 
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