Plate tectonics in the classification of personality disorder: shifting to a dimensional model.

@article{Widiger2007PlateTI,
  title={Plate tectonics in the classification of personality disorder: shifting to a dimensional model.},
  author={Thomas A. Widiger and Timothy J. Trull},
  journal={The American psychologist},
  year={2007},
  volume={62 2},
  pages={
          71-83
        }
}
  • T. Widiger, T. Trull
  • Published 1 February 2007
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American psychologist
The diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were developed in the spirit of a traditional medical model that considers mental disorders to be qualitatively distinct conditions (see, e.g., American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Work is now beginning on the fifth edition of this influential diagnostic manual. It is perhaps time to consider a fundamental shift in how psychopathology is conceptualized and diagnosed… 
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