Plastic ingestion by mesopelagic fishes in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

@article{Davison2011PlasticIB,
  title={Plastic ingestion by mesopelagic fishes in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre},
  author={Peter C. Davison and Rebecca G. Asch},
  journal={Marine Ecology Progress Series},
  year={2011},
  volume={432},
  pages={173-180}
}
The oceanic convergence zone in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre acts to accumulate floating marine debris, including plastic fragments of various sizes. Little is known about the ecolog- ical consequences of pelagic plastic accumulation. During the 2009 Scripps Environmental Accumu- lation of Plastics Expedition (SEAPLEX), we investigated whether mesopelagic fishes ingest plastic debris. A total of 141 fishes from 27 species were dissected to examine whether their stomach con- tents… 

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