Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) RNA levels in HIV-related cognitive impairment.

Abstract

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were prospectively measured by the Roche Amplicor Monitor polymerase chain reaction assay in 30 HIV-1 infected patients without central nervous system opportunistic infections. All participants completed a global neuropsychological battery consisting of Mattis Dementia Rating Scale. Additional tests were used to better characterize the type of cognitive changes with a specific reference to frontal lobe function. The neuropsychological evaluation confirmed the subcortical pattern of cognitive dysfunction. CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were significantly correlated. No correlation was detected with either blood or CSF RNA levels and the global cognitive status, but when stratified in three cognitive subgroups, higher CSF HIV-1 RNA levels were observed in the more cognitively impaired subjects. Our results provide further evidence that plasma and CSF HIV-1 RNA level cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic marker for HIV-1 associated cognitive disorders. Only longitudinal studies will determine whether a high CSF HIV-1 level could be a risk factor for HIV-1 dementia.

Cite this paper

@article{Stankoff1999PlasmaAC, title={Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) RNA levels in HIV-related cognitive impairment.}, author={Bruno Stankoff and Vincent Calvez and Samuel Vasallo Suarez and Ph Bossi and Omer Rosenblum and Leslie Conquy and E . Turell and Thierry Dubard and A . Coutellier and Laurence Baril and François Bricaire and Lucette Lacomblez and Catherine Lubetzki}, journal={European journal of neurology}, year={1999}, volume={6 6}, pages={669-75} }