Plant-soil biota interactions and spatial distribution of black cherry in its native and invasive ranges

@article{Reinhart2003PlantsoilBI,
  title={Plant-soil biota interactions and spatial distribution of black cherry in its native and invasive ranges},
  author={K. Reinhart and Alissa Packer and W. H. Putten and K. Clay},
  journal={Ecology Letters},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={1046-1050}
}
  • K. Reinhart, Alissa Packer, +1 author K. Clay
  • Published 2003
  • Biology
  • Ecology Letters
  • One explanation for the higher abundance of invasive species in their non-native than native ranges is the escape from natural enemies. But there are few experimental studies comparing the parallel impact of enemies (or competitors and mutualists) on a plant species in its native and invaded ranges, and release from soil pathogens has been rarely investigated. Here we present evidence showing that the invasion of black cherry (Prunus serotina) into north-western Europe is facilitated by the… CONTINUE READING
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