Plant root proliferation in nitrogen–rich patches confers competitive advantage

@article{Robinson1999PlantRP,
  title={Plant root proliferation in nitrogen–rich patches confers competitive advantage},
  author={D. Robinson and A. Hodge and B. Griffiths and A. Fitter},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1999},
  volume={266},
  pages={431 - 435}
}
Plants respond strongly to environmental heterogeneity, particularly below ground, where spectacular root proliferations in nutrient–rich patches may occur. Such ‘foraging’ responses apparently maximize nutrient uptake and are now prominent in plant ecological theory. Proliferations in nitrogen–rich patches are difficult to explain adaptively, however. The high mobility of soil nitrate should limit the contribution of proliferation to N capture. Many experiments on isolated plants show only a… Expand

Figures from this paper

Root proliferation, nitrate inflow and their carbon costs during nitrogen capture by competing plants in patchy soil
  • D. Robinson
  • Chemistry, Environmental Science
  • Plant and Soil
  • 2004
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