Plant responses to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

@article{Loon2007PlantRT,
  title={Plant responses to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria},
  author={Leendert C. van Loon},
  journal={European Journal of Plant Pathology},
  year={2007},
  volume={119},
  pages={243-254}
}
  • L. C. Loon
  • Published 5 June 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • European Journal of Plant Pathology
Non-pathogenic soilborne microorganisms can promote plant growth, as well as suppress diseases. Plant growth promotion is taken to result from improved nutrient acquisition or hormonal stimulation. Disease suppression can occur through microbial antagonism or induction of resistance in the plant. Several rhizobacterial strains have been shown to act as plant growth-promoting bacteria through both stimulation of growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR), but it is not clear in how far both… 

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