Plant Stomata Function in Innate Immunity against Bacterial Invasion

@article{Melotto2006PlantSF,
  title={Plant Stomata Function in Innate Immunity against Bacterial Invasion},
  author={Maeli Melotto and William Underwood and Jessica M. Koczan and Kinya Nomura and Sheng Yang He},
  journal={Cell},
  year={2006},
  volume={126},
  pages={969-980}
}
Microbial entry into host tissue is a critical first step in causing infection in animals and plants. In plants, it has been assumed that microscopic surface openings, such as stomata, serve as passive ports of bacterial entry during infection. Surprisingly, we found that stomatal closure is part of a plant innate immune response to restrict bacterial invasion. Stomatal guard cells of Arabidopsis perceive bacterial surface molecules, which requires the FLS2 receptor, production of nitric oxide… Expand
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