Plant-Animal Mutualism: Coevolution with Dodo Leads to Near Extinction of Plant

@article{Temple1977PlantAnimalMC,
  title={Plant-Animal Mutualism: Coevolution with Dodo Leads to Near Extinction of Plant},
  author={Stanley A. Temple},
  journal={Science},
  year={1977},
  volume={197},
  pages={885 - 886}
}
  • S. A. Temple
  • Published 26 August 1977
  • Environmental Science
  • Science
An endemic sapotaceous tree Calvaria major found on the island of Mauritius is nearly extinct because its seeds apparently required passage through the digestive tract of the now-extinct dodo Raphus cucullatus to overcome persistent seed coat dormancy caused by a specially thickened endocarp. 
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TLDR
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