Planning for Sea-Level Rise: Quantifying Patterns of Saltmarsh Sparrow (Ammodramus Caudacutus) Nest Flooding Under Current Sea-Level Conditions

@inproceedings{Bayard2011PlanningFS,
  title={Planning for Sea-Level Rise: Quantifying Patterns of Saltmarsh Sparrow (Ammodramus Caudacutus) Nest Flooding Under Current Sea-Level Conditions},
  author={Trina S. Bayard and Chris S. Elphick},
  year={2011}
}
ABSTRACT. Climate change and sea-level rise pose an imminent threat to the survival of coastal ecosystems, but the mechanisms by which animals inhabiting these areas may be affected by these changes are not well studied. During 2007–2009, we quantified the frequency of nest-flooding events at two salt marshes located in the northeastern United States that are of global importance to Saltmarsh Sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus) conservation. Although nest flooding is a major cause of nest failure… 
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