Placebo improves pleasure and pain through opposite modulation of sensory processing.

@article{Ellingsen2013PlaceboIP,
  title={Placebo improves pleasure and pain through opposite modulation of sensory processing.},
  author={Dan-Mikael Ellingsen and Johan Wessberg and Marie Eikemo and Jaquette Liljencrantz and Tor Endestad and H{\aa}kan Olausson and Siri Leknes},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2013},
  volume={110 44},
  pages={17993-8}
}
Placebo analgesia is often conceptualized as a reward mechanism. However, by targeting only negative experiences, such as pain, placebo research may tell only half the story. We compared placebo improvement of painful touch (analgesia) with placebo improvement of pleasant touch (hyperhedonia) using functional MRI and a crossover design. Somatosensory processing was decreased during placebo analgesia and increased during placebo hyperhedonia. Both placebo responses were associated with similar… CONTINUE READING

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