Placebo, Prozac and PLoS: significant lessons for psychopharmacology

@article{Horder2011PlaceboPA,
  title={Placebo, Prozac and PLoS: significant lessons for psychopharmacology},
  author={Jamie Horder and Paul R L Matthews and Robert J. Waldmann},
  journal={Journal of Psychopharmacology},
  year={2011},
  volume={25},
  pages={1277 - 1288}
}
Kirsch et al. (2008, Initial severity and antidepressant benefits: a meta-analysis of data submitted to the Food and Drug Administration. PLoS Med 5: e45), conducted a meta-analysis of data from 35 placebo controlled trials of four newer antidepressants. They concluded that while these drugs are statistically significantly superior to placebo in acute depression, the benefits are unlikely to be clinically significant. This paper has attracted much attention and debate in both academic journals… Expand
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TLDR
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Horder et al. (in press) criticize the results of Kirsch et al. (2008) solely on the basis of meta-analytical methodology. In the letter by Matthews (2011) commenting on our paper (Fountoulakis &Expand
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TLDR
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