Pigeons can discriminate “good” and “bad” paintings by children

@article{Watanabe2009PigeonsCD,
  title={Pigeons can discriminate “good” and “bad” paintings by children},
  author={Shigeru Watanabe},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2009},
  volume={13},
  pages={75-85}
}
Humans have the unique ability to create art, but non-human animals may be able to discriminate “good” art from “bad” art. In this study, I investigated whether pigeons could be trained to discriminate between paintings that had been judged by humans as either “bad” or “good”. To do this, adult human observers first classified several children’s paintings as either “good” (beautiful) or “bad” (ugly). Using operant conditioning procedures, pigeons were then reinforced for pecking at “good… CONTINUE READING
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