Picture Perfect: The Relationship between Selfie Behaviors, Self-Objectification, and Depressive Symptoms

@article{Lamp2019PicturePT,
  title={Picture Perfect: The Relationship between Selfie Behaviors, Self-Objectification, and Depressive Symptoms},
  author={Sophia J. Lamp and Alyssa Cugle and Aimee L. Silverman and M. Ten{\'e} Thomas and Miriam Liss and Mindy J. Erchull},
  journal={Sex Roles},
  year={2019},
  pages={1-9}
}
Social media use has been linked to depression, although there is evidence that how one uses social media matters. Self-objectification may influence social media-related behaviors, such as taking many pictures before posting and using photo editing. These may be related to negative outcomes, perhaps because they contribute to feeling disingenuous online. These relationships were explored in the context of selfie posting on Instagram among a sample of young U.S. women who completed self-report… 
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