Phytoplankton growth and stoichiometry under multiple nutrient limitation

@article{Klausmeier2004PhytoplanktonGA,
  title={Phytoplankton growth and stoichiometry under multiple nutrient limitation},
  author={Christopher A. Klausmeier and Elena Litchman and Simon A. Levin},
  journal={Limnology and Oceanography},
  year={2004},
  volume={49}
}
Phytoplankton growth and stoichiometry depend on the availability of multiple nutrients. We use a mathematical model of phytoplankton with flexible stoichiometry to explain patterns of phytoplankton composition in chemostat experiments and nutrient drawdown dynamics that are found in the field. Exponential growth and equilibrium represent two distinct phases, each amenable to mathematical analysis. In a chemostat at a fixed dilution (growth) rate, phytoplankton stoichiometry matches the… 
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CONSTRAINTS ON PRIMARY PRODUCER N:P STOICHIOMETRY ALONG N:P SUPPLY RATIO GRADIENTS
TLDR
This hypothesis was tested using data from ponds in Michigan, USA, a freshwater mesocosm experiment, a synthesis of studies from diverse systems, and simple dynamic models of producer growth and nutrient content and predicted that both high loss rates (sinking, grazing) and physiological limits to nutrient storage capacity could attenuate producer stoichiometry.
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