Phytophthora ramorum: integrative research and management of an emerging pathogen in California and Oregon forests.

@article{Rizzo2005PhytophthoraRI,
  title={Phytophthora ramorum: integrative research and management of an emerging pathogen in California and Oregon forests.},
  author={David M. Rizzo and Matteo Garbelotto and Everett Hansen},
  journal={Annual review of phytopathology},
  year={2005},
  volume={43},
  pages={
          309-35
        }
}
Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death, is an emerging plant pathogen first observed in North America associated with mortality of tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) and coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) in coastal forests of California during the mid-1990s. The pathogen is now known to occur in North America and Europe and have a host range of over 40 plant genera. Sudden oak death has become an example of unintended linkages between the horticultural industry and potential… 

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