Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

@article{Tyler2006PhytophthoraGS,
  title={Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis},
  author={Brett M. Tyler and Sucheta Tripathy and Xuemin Zhang and Paramvir S. Dehal and Rays H. Y. Jiang and Andrea Aerts and Felipe D. Arredondo and Laura Baxter and Douda Bensasson and Jim L Beynon and Jarrod Chapman and Cynthia Maria Borges Damasceno and Anne E. Dorrance and Daolong Dou and Allan W. Dickerman and Inna Dubchak and Matteo Garbelotto and Mark Gijzen and Stuart G. Gordon and Francine Govers and Niklaus J. Grunwald and Wayne Huang and Kelly L Ivors and Richard W. Jones and Sophien Kamoun and Konstantinos Krampis and Kurt Lamour and Mi-Kyung Lee and W. Hayes McDonald and M{\'o}nica Medina and Harold J. G. Meijer and Eric K. Nordberg and Donald J. Maclean and Manuel D. Ospina-Giraldo and Paul F. Morris and Vipaporn Phuntumart and Nicholas H. Putnam and Sam Rash and Jocelyn K C Rose and Yasuko Sakihama and Asaf A. Salamov and Alon Savidor and Chantel F. Scheuring and Brian M. Smith and Bruno W. S. Sobral and Astrid Y Terry and Trudy A Torto-Alalibo and Joe Win and Zhanyou Xu and Hongbin Zhang and Igor V. Grigoriev and Daniel S. Rokhsar and Jeffrey L. Boore},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={313},
  pages={1261 - 1266}
}
Draft genome sequences have been determined for the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae and the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Oömycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms, and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin supports a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein… Expand
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