Phytoestrogens and breast cancer: a complex story

@article{Helferich2008PhytoestrogensAB,
  title={Phytoestrogens and breast cancer: a complex story},
  author={William G Helferich and Juan E. Andrade and Martin S. Hoagland},
  journal={Inflammopharmacology},
  year={2008},
  volume={16},
  pages={219-226}
}
Abstract.Genistein is an isoflavone with oestrogenic activity that is present in a variety of soy products as a constituent of complex mixtures of bioactive compounds, whose matrix profiles play an important role in determining the overall oestrogenic bioactivity of genistein. We review data on how the profile of soy bioactive compounds can modulate genistein-stimulated oestrogen-dependent tumour growth. Our research has focused on the effects of dietary genistein on the growth of oestrogen (E… 
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A CHEMOPREVENTIVE FACTOR IN PROSTATE CANCER
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Genistein intervention modulated the expression of several biomarkers which may be related to PCa prediction and progression, and supports genistein as a chemopreventive agent in PCa.
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TLDR
The results reveal that genistein is unique among the flavonoids tested, in that it has potent estrogen agonist and cell growth-inhibitory actions over a physiologically relevant concentration range.
Dietary genistin stimulates growth of estrogen-dependent breast cancer tumors similar to that observed with genistein.
TLDR
Evidence is presented that demonstrates conversion of genistin to its aglycone form genistein begins in the mouth and then continues in the small intestine, which can stimulate estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell growth in vivo.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Genistein may represent a member of a new class of dietary-derived anti-angiogenic compounds that contribute to the preventive effect of a plant-based diet on chronic diseases, including solid tumors, by inhibiting neovascularization.
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TLDR
It is unlikely that the plasma concentration required to inhibit cancer cell growth in vivo can be achieved from a dietary dosage of genistein, according to the data presented.
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