Physiology Complements Population Structure of Two Endemic Log-Dwelling Beetles

@inproceedings{Schmuki2007PhysiologyCP,
  title={Physiology Complements Population Structure of Two Endemic Log-Dwelling Beetles},
  author={Christina Schmuki and James D. Woodman and Paul Sunnucks},
  booktitle={Environmental entomology},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Given rapid, global land modification and the likelihood of major global climate changes, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the physiological limits and capabilities of species to allow more accurate prediction of species’ distributions under different scenarios of climate and landscape management. We studied whether the different habitat requirements of two species of tenebrionid beetles in temperate eucalypt forest could explain their patterns of dispersal and gene… 
The application of genetic markers to landscape management
There is great concern about how landscape change will affect the persistence of native biota, and the services they provide to human wellbeing. Of fundamental concern is the effect on population

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