Physiological models to understand exercise fatigue and the adaptations that predict or enhance athletic performance

@article{Noakes2000PhysiologicalMT,
  title={Physiological models to understand exercise fatigue and the adaptations that predict or enhance athletic performance},
  author={Timothy David Noakes},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Medicine \& Science in Sports},
  year={2000},
  volume={10}
}
  • T. Noakes
  • Published 1 June 2000
  • Biology
  • Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
A popular concept in the exercise sciences holds that fatigue develops during exercise of moderate to high intensity, when the capacity of the cardiorespiratory system to provide oxygen to the exercising muscles falls behind their demand inducing “anaerobic” metabolism. But this cardiovascular/anaerobic model is unsatisfactory because (i) a more rigorous analysis indicates that the first organ to be affected by anaerobiosis during maximal exercise would likely be the heart, not the skeletal… 
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