Physiological Role of Pleasure

@article{Cabanac1971PhysiologicalRO,
  title={Physiological Role of Pleasure},
  author={Michel Cabanac},
  journal={Science},
  year={1971},
  volume={173},
  pages={1103 - 1107}
}
  • M. Cabanac
  • Published 17 September 1971
  • Psychology
  • Science
A given stimulus can induce a pleasant or unpleasant sensation depending on the subject's internal state. The word alliesthesia is proposed to describe this phenomenon. It is, in itself, an adequate motivation for behavior such as food intake or thermoregulation. Therefore, negative regulatory feedback systems, based upon oropharingeal or cutaneous thermal signals are peripheral only in appearance, since the motivational component of the sensation is of internal origin. The internal signals… 
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