Physiological Proteomics of the Uncultured Endosymbiont of Riftia pachyptila

@article{Markert2007PhysiologicalPO,
  title={Physiological Proteomics of the Uncultured Endosymbiont of Riftia pachyptila},
  author={Stephanie Markert and C. Arndt and Horst Felbeck and D{\"o}rte Becher and Stefan M. Sievert and Michael H{\"u}gler and Dirk Albrecht and Julie Robidart and Shellie R. Bench and Robert Alan Feldman and Michael Hecker and Thomas Schweder},
  journal={Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={315},
  pages={247 - 250}
}
The bacterial endosymbiont of the deep-sea tube worm Riftia pachyptila has never been successfully cultivated outside its host. In the absence of cultivation data, we have taken a proteomic approach based on the metagenome sequence to study the metabolism of this peculiar microorganism in detail. As one result, we found that three major sulfide oxidation proteins constitute ∼12% of the total cytosolic proteome, which highlights the essential role of these enzymes for the symbiont's energy… 
Metabolic versatility of the Riftia pachyptila endosymbiont revealed through metagenomics.
TLDR
The symbiont population metagenome was sequenced in order to gain insight into its physiology and the physiology of Candidatus Endoriftia persephone is explored with respect to functionality while associated with a eukaryotic host, versus free-living in the hydrothermal environment.
Status quo in physiological proteomics of the uncultured Riftia pachyptila endosymbiont
TLDR
The proteomic view supports the hypothesis that the Riftia symbiont uses nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor, and a comprehensive survey of the symbiotic physiology was established.
Centrifugation-Based Enrichment of Bacterial Cell Populations for Metaproteomic Studies on Bacteria-Invertebrate Symbioses.
Owing to high sample complexity, metaproteomic investigations on bacteria-animal symbioses with two or more uncultured partners can be challenging. A selective isolation or enrichment of distinct
Quantitative analysis of the intramacrophagic Brucella suis proteome reveals metabolic adaptation to late stage of cellular infection
TLDR
The majority of the 44 proteins significantly regulated at this stage of infection were involved in bacterial metabolism and 40% were present in lowered concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an adaptive response by quantitative reduction of processes participating in energy, protein, and nucleic acid metabolism.
Functional Characterization of Microbial Symbiotic Associations by Metaproteomics
TLDR
The CRISPR/Cas system, comprised of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats along with their associated proteins, protects bacteria and archaea from viral predation and invading nucleic acids and the response of Cas protein expression to phage infection has yet to be elucidated.
Physiological homogeneity among the endosymbionts of Riftia pachyptila and Tevnia jerichonana revealed by proteogenomics
TLDR
The data strongly suggest that the two tubeworm species are able to effectively attenuate differences in habitat conditions, and thus to provide their symbionts with similar micro-environments.
Identification of proteins involved in the functioning of Riftia pachyptila symbiosis by Subtractive Suppression Hybridization
TLDR
This study focused on the transcripts the authors identified as the most interesting ones based on the BLAST results, and identified the sequences preferentially expressed in the branchial plume tissue and in the trophosome using the body wall as a reference tissue.
Uncultivated Lineages and Host–Microbe Interaction in Saline Environment
TLDR
The identification of the unfamiliar microbial species based on functions and sequences of the host–microbe interaction opens new arena of the adaptation in extreme ecosystems, including saline habitats.
Host-microbe interactions in the chemosynthetic Riftia pachyptila symbiosis
TLDR
This study sequenced the Riftia transcriptome, which enabled comparative metaproteomic analyses of symbiont-containing versus symbionT-free tissues, both under energy-rich and energy-limited conditions, and provides unprecedented insights into host-microbe interactions that shape this highly efficient symbiosis.
Endosymbiont genomes yield clues of tubeworm success
TLDR
The comparative genomic results help elucidate potential mechanisms used to allow chemosynthetically dependent holobionts adapt to, and evolve in, different environments and find that the ability to use hydrogen, as an additional energy source, is potentially more widespread than previously recognized.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES
Autotrophic Carbon Fixation by the Chemoautotrophic Symbionts of Riftia pachyptila
TLDR
Maximal rates of carbon fixation were documented in incubations in dilute Riftia blood, which protects the symbionts from the inhibitory effects of free sulfide and oxygen while providing them with an abundant pool of both substrates, bound by the v...
Pathways of inorganic carbon fixation in the endosymbiont‐bearing lucinid clam Lucinoma aequizonata. Part 1. Purification and characterization of the endosymbiotic bacteria
Two simple techniques by which the sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiotic bacteria may be purified from the bacteriocyte tissues of the marine bivalve Lucinoma aequizonata, are described. Tissue homogenates
Prokaryotic Cells in the Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm Riftia pachyptila Jones: Possible Chemoautotrophic Symbionts.
The existence of a symbiotic association between vestimentiferan tube worms from deep-sea hydrothermal vents and chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, based on histological and enzymatic
Glycogen storage in the Riftia pachyptila trophosome: contribution of host and symbionts
TLDR
Glycogen storage in host tissue and symbiotic bacteria in the anterior trophosome of theimentiferan tubeworm Riftia pachyptila Jones, 1981, was investigated using transmission elec-tron microscope and stereological methods to show that host and symbionts contribute equally to the total glycogen content of the trophOSome.
The bacterial symbiont from the hydrothermal vent tubewormRiftia pachyptila is a sulfide specialist
TLDR
Whole-worm experiments under pressure showed a rapid removal of35S-sulfide from the incubation water, with sulfide, sulfate, and polysulfides appearing in the blood within 4 h, and there was no utilization of thiosulfate by the whole worms, freshly homogenized trophosome tissue, or isolated bacteria.
The color of the trophosome: elemental sulfur distribution in the endosymbionts of Riftia pachyptila (Vestimentifera; Siboglinidae)
TLDR
The proportion of (two-dimensional) area occupied by sulfur vesicles in the cells was found to be strongly correlated with trophosome color, both in individuals with uniformly colored trophsomes and individuals that exhibited a gradual color change along the length of their trophOSomes.
Analysis of Hydrothermal Vent-Associated Symbionts by Ribosomal RNA Sequences
TLDR
The sequence comparisons suggest that Riftia is more closely related to the bivalves than their current taxonomic status would suggest.
Riftia pachyptila Jones: Observations on the Vestimentiferan Worm from the Galapagos Rift.
The obturacular plume, composed of numerous tentacles, is suggested as a site for the uptake of molecular "food" by Riftia pachyptila (Pogonophora) from the Galápagos Rift; symbiotic bacteria are
Calvin-Benson cycle and sulphide oxidation enzymes in animals from sulphide-rich habitats
TLDR
All the vestimentiferan worms and several of the molluscs were found to contain enzyme activities associated with sulphide oxidation, the Calvin-Benson cycle and nitrate reduction, suggesting that the putative animal-bacterial symbiosis first described in Riftia pachyptila may be of widespread occurrence in species living in environments offering simultaneous access to sulphide and oxygen.
...
1
2
...