Physiologic and molecular bases of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy: impact of resistance exercise on human skeletal muscle (protein and exercise dose effects).

@article{Phillips2009PhysiologicAM,
  title={Physiologic and molecular bases of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy: impact of resistance exercise on human skeletal muscle (protein and exercise dose effects).},
  author={Stuart M Phillips},
  journal={Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme},
  year={2009},
  volume={34 3},
  pages={403-10}
}
Normally, skeletal muscle mass is unchanged, beyond periods of growth, but it begins to decline in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The mass of skeletal muscle is maintained by ingestion of protein-containing meals. With feeding, muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is stimulated and a small suppression of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) occurs, such that protein balance becomes positive (MPS>MPB). As the postprandial period subsides and a transition toward fasting occurs, the balance of muscle… CONTINUE READING
Related Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 1 time. VIEW TWEETS

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 43 extracted citations

Molecular networks in skeletal muscle plasticity.

The Journal of experimental biology • 2016
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Is repetition failure critical for the development of muscle hypertrophy and strength?

Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports • 2016
View 1 Excerpt

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 91 references

Nutrient signalling in the regulation of human muscle protein synthesis.

The Journal of physiology • 2007
View 11 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Atrophy and impaired muscle protein synthesis during prolonged inactivity and stress.

The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism • 2006
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Early signaling responses to divergent exercise stimuli in skeletal muscle from well-trained humans.

FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology • 2006
View 3 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Amino acid ingestion improves muscle protein synthesis in the young and elderly.

American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism • 2004
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Branched-chain amino acids increase p70S6k phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.

American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism • 2004
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…