Physicians' attitudes and practices regarding the long-term prescribing of opioids for non-cancer pain

@article{Turk1994PhysiciansAA,
  title={Physicians' attitudes and practices regarding the long-term prescribing of opioids for non-cancer pain},
  author={Dennis C. Turk and Michael C. Brody and E. Akiko Okifuji},
  journal={Pain},
  year={1994},
  volume={59},
  pages={201-208}
}
&NA; Prescribing long‐term opioids for patients with chronic pain is controversial. The primary purpose of this study was to examine physicians' beliefs about and prescribing of the long‐term use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain patients. Concerns about regulatory pressure and appropriateness of education regarding opioids were also examined. The design was a stratified random sample. In the United States, 6962 physicians were randomly selected from two states in each of five regions… Expand
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