Physicians' and patients' attitudes toward manual medicine: Implications for continuing medical education

@article{Stoll2003PhysiciansAP,
  title={Physicians' and patients' attitudes toward manual medicine: Implications for continuing medical education},
  author={Scott T. Stoll and David P. Russo and James W. Atchison},
  journal={Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions},
  year={2003},
  volume={23},
  pages={13–20}
}
Introduction: Manual medicine (MM) is a physical modality infrequently used in primary care clinics. This study examines primary care physicians' experience with and attitudes toward the use of MM in the primary care setting, as well as patients' experience with and attitudes toward MM. Methods: Survevs were distributed to a convenience sample of physicians (54.3% response rate) attending a 1‐week primary care continuing medical education (CME) conference in Kentucky. Similar surveys were also… 

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