Physical activity and stress resilience: Considering those at-risk for developing mental health problems

@article{Hegberg2015PhysicalAA,
  title={Physical activity and stress resilience: Considering those at-risk for developing mental health problems},
  author={Nicole J. Hegberg and Erin B. Tone},
  journal={Mental Health and Physical Activity},
  year={2015},
  volume={8},
  pages={1-7}
}
  • Nicole J. Hegberg, Erin B. Tone
  • Published 2015
  • Psychology
  • Mental Health and Physical Activity
  • Abstract Introduction Physical activity (PA) has been shown to benefit mental health. While research on non-human animal species indicates that PA may confer protective effects on mental health by increasing resilience to stress via regulation of the stress response, the human literature offers inconsistent evidence regarding this idea. To help reconcile these inconsistencies, the present study of human adults tested the hypothesis that PA's protective effects, as indexed by self-perceived… CONTINUE READING

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