Corpus ID: 8436520

Physical activity and cancer prevention: from observational to intervention research.

@article{Friedenreich2001PhysicalAA,
  title={Physical activity and cancer prevention: from observational to intervention research.},
  author={Christine M. Friedenreich},
  journal={Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers \& prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology},
  year={2001},
  volume={10 4},
  pages={
          287-301
        }
}
  • C. Friedenreich
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
The purpose of this review is to articulate how progress in epidemiological research on physical activity and cancer prevention can be made. This report briefly reviews the accumulated evidence for an etiological role of physical activity in the prevention of cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, testes, lung, endometrium, and ovary and summarizes the evidence for a causal association for each of these sites. The evidence for a causal association between physical activity and colon and breast… Expand
Physical activity in the prevention of cancer.
TLDR
A greater understanding of the biological mechanisms operating in the physical activity--cancer relation, complete measurements of physical activity through a subject's life, assessment of all potential confounders and association modifiers are needed to confirm a protective role of physical activities in cancer development and allow specific exercise prescriptions for prevention in particular cancer sites. Expand
Physical activity and the prevention of cancer: a review of recent findings
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Objective: The purpose of this paper is to update epidemiological research on relations between physical activity and cancer risk, including physical activity measurement and potential mechanisms ofExpand
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Evidence is increasing that exercise also influences other aspects of the cancer experience, including cancer detection, coping, rehabilitation and survival after diagnosis. Expand
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Overall, the evidence is sufficiently established to recommend physical activity as a means for the primary prevention of cancer. Expand
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TLDR
A body of evidence is growing that supports a protective effect of physical activity for lung and endometrial cancers as well, and findings suggest that increased levels of physical fitness decrease the risk of cancer mortality by more than 50% in men. Expand
State of the epidemiological evidence on physical activity and cancer prevention.
TLDR
There is strong and consistent evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of several of the major cancer sites, and that between 9% and 19% of cancer cases could be attributed to lack of sufficient physical activity in Europe. Expand
Physical activity and gynecologic cancer prevention.
  • A. Cust
  • Medicine
  • Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progres dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • 2011
TLDR
There is insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion on a possible role of physical activity in the development of cervical cancer, although a modest influence on risk is possible through effects on sex steroid hormones and immune function. Expand
The role of physical activity in breast cancer etiology.
TLDR
Future research should focus on elucidating the exact type, dose, and timing of physical activity required to reduce breast cancer risk, as well as prospective observational epidemiologic studies of lifetime physical activity patterns and Breast cancer risk. Expand
Physical activity and breast cancer: review of the epidemiologic evidence and biologic mechanisms.
  • C. Friedenreich
  • Medicine
  • Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progres dans les recherches sur le cancer
  • 2011
TLDR
It is likely that physical activity is associated with decreased breast cancer risk via multiple interrelated biologic pathways that may involve adiposity, sex hormones, insulin resistance, adipokines, and chronic inflammation. Expand
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