Physical, Complementary, and Alternative Medicine in the Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders

@article{Arnouk2017PhysicalCA,
  title={Physical, Complementary, and Alternative Medicine in the Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders},
  author={Alex Arnouk and Elise J B De and Alexandra W. Rehfuss and Carin Cappadocia and Samantha Dickson and Fei Lian},
  journal={Current Urology Reports},
  year={2017},
  volume={18},
  pages={1-13}
}
Purpose of ReviewThe purpose of the study was to catalog the most recent available literature regarding the use of conservative measures in treatment of pelvic floor disorders.Recent FindingsPelvic floor disorders encompass abnormalities of urination, defecation, sexual function, pelvic organ prolapse, and chronic pain, and can have significant quality of life implications for patients. Current guidelines recommend behavioral modifications and conservative treatments as first-line therapy for… 

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