Phylogeography of the Y‐chromosome haplogroup C in northern Eurasia

@article{Malyarchuk2010PhylogeographyOT,
  title={Phylogeography of the Y‐chromosome haplogroup C in northern Eurasia},
  author={B. Malyarchuk and M. Derenko and G. Denisova and M. Woźniak and T. Grzybowski and I. Dambueva and I. Zakharov},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={74}
}
To reconstruct the phylogenetic structure of Y‐chromosome haplogroup (hg) C in populations of northern Eurasia, we have analyzed the diversity of microsatellite (STR) loci in a total sample of 413 males from 18 ethnic groups of Siberia, Eastern Asia and Eastern Europe. Analysis of SNP markers revealed that all Y‐chromosomes studied belong to hg C3 and its subhaplogroups C3c and C3d, although some populations (such as Mongols and Koryaks) demonstrate a relatively high input (more than 30%) of… Expand
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